our logo depicts the chemical
makeup of the neuropeptides
studied in the lab
Spring view of Beaumont Tower at MSU
Spring view of Beaumont Tower at MSU

Meet the Team

Caroline Smith
Caroline Smith

Graduate Student

McGuinn 524

phone: 617-552-6149

email: caroline.smith.3[at]bc.edu

Research Interests

Vasopressin and oxytocin regulate a wide variety of social behaviors, notably social recognition, aggression, and affiliation. Little is known about how vasopressin and oxytocin mediate the regulation of these distinctive behaviors. I am interested in exploring the neural circuits by which vasopressin and oxytocin modulate this range of different social behaviors.

Positions and Education
Since 2011

Graduate student (Ph.D. candidate) at the Department of Psychology of Boston College

2013

M.A. in Psychology (Neuroscience Concentration) at the Department of Psychology of Boston College

2010-2011

Research Assistant in the lab of Dr. Alexa Veenema at the Department of Psychology of Boston College

2010

Research Assistant in the lab of Dr. Nancy Forger at the Department of Psychology of UMass-Amherst

B.S. in Psychology, Neuroscience Track, University of Massachusetts-Amherst

2009

Research Assistant in the lab of Dr. Geert de Vries at the Department of Psychology of UMass-Amherst

Awards and Honors

Travel Award, FENS Forum of Neuroscience, Milan, Italy, 2014

NSF GRFP 2012138127, graduate research fellowship, 2012-2015

Travel Award, Workshop on the Biology of Pro-Social Behavior, Emory University, Atlanta, 2011

Publications

Smith CJ, Poehlmann ML, Li S, Ratnaseelan AM, Bredewold R, Veenema AH (2016) Age and sex differences in oxytocin and vasopressin V1a receptor binding densities in the rat brain: focus on the social decision-making network. Brain Struct Funct, Jul 7 [Epub ahead of print].

Smith CJW, Wilkins KB, Mogavero JN, Veenema AH (2015) Social novelty investigation in the juvenile rat: Modulation by the opioid system. J Neuroendocrinol 27:752-764.

Bredewold R, Smith CJW, Dumais KM, Veenema AH (2014) Sex-specific modulation of juvenile social play behavior by vasopressin and oxytocin depends on social context. Front Behav Neurosci Jun 16;8:216.

Rood BD, Stott RT, You S, Smith CJ, Woodbury ME, De Vries GJ (2013) Site of origin of and sex differences in the vasopressin innervation of the mouse (Mus musculus) brain. J Comp Neurol 521:2321-58.