Andrew Tirrell

         Boston College International Studies Program

                       andrew.tirrell@bc.edu

        Office Hours: Wednesdays, 2:15-4:15pm, Carney 244 
 

 

 

 

 

 

BA, Brandeis University; MALD, Ph.D. (expected, 2015) Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy; JD, Columbia Law School

Initially trained as a human rights attorney, I focus my research on rights-based approaches to natural resource management, sustainable development, and climate change adaptation. Before returning to academia, my legal practice was predominantly in Latin America, Southeast Asia, and New York City on issues of development, environmental protection, education, and human rights. As a scholar, I have continued to study those regions and issues, but recently I began a dissertation project examining the effectiveness of fisheries management regimes in several communities in Arctic Norway, New Zealand, Hawaii, and New England. A large part of this research relates to the durability, change, and interplay of cultural, social, and political institutions, and how these impact governance across various scales. In a similar vein, I am currently working on a project comparing and contrasting changes in religious institutions in Europe and the United States over the past several centuries.

Over the years, in addition to legal practice with human rights organizations and commercial law firms, I have consulted for and advised various NGOs and non-profit organizations in the areas of sustainable development, child rights, and educational development. In 2008, I helped to found an educational advocacy organization and was featured as a guest columnist in The New York Times on the subject of educational rights. I am a current doctoral candidate at the Fletcher School at Tufts University, and my research is supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and the Henry J. Leir Foundation.

 

Courses Taught

Fall 2013

IN260- International Environmental Science & Policy
This course examines both the science underlying today's international environmental problems and the policy decisions that drive human actions and responses. We begin by exploring three foundational topics: the global commons, environmental governance, and natural resource valuation. Core concepts from these sessions will continue to arise as we progress into classes focused on particular sectors of environmental studies, such as climate change, sustainable development, energy and conservation. Upon completion of the course, students will be prepared to engage with issues from a wide range of environmental policy areas, and will have further developed their capacity for analysis, rhetoric, and written expression. Syllabus

Course size limited to 18

IN272- Human Rights and the UN Review Process 
This course provides a foundational understanding of human rights in theory and practice. Students will gain an appreciation of the how the United Nations human rights system works, how rights are monitored, and the limitations of enforcement mechanisms. We will also cover how human rights reports are created and explore issues relating to the interpretation of facts, claims, and events in documenting human rights. A major component of the course will involve the creation of a report on one of the countries scheduled for review in the next Universal Periodic Review session of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
Syllabus

Course size limited to 18

 

Spring 2014

IN261- Indigenous Rights and Natural Resources
What roles do indigenous peoples play in conflicts over natural resources? This seminar course will examine conflicts between indigenous peoples, governments, and corporations in order to better understand why these events occur throughout the world. Whether it's hydro-electric dams in Brazil and Laos, mines in Peru and Guatemala, or tourism in Panama, struggles between indigenous groups and forces of “development” are ubiquitous, and the frequency of these conflicts is on the rise. Through case studies, an interactive negotiation simulation, and an academic mini-conference, we will explore indigenous rights and natural resources issues through a variety of lenses. Syllabus

Course size limited to 16

IN272- Human Rights and the UN Review Process
This course provides a foundational understanding of human rights in theory and practice. Students will gain an appreciation of the how the United Nations human rights system works, how rights are monitored, and the limitations of enforcement mechanisms. We will also cover how human rights reports are created and explore issues relating to the interpretation of facts, claims, and events in documenting human rights. A major component of the course will involve the creation of a report on one of the countries scheduled for review in the next Universal Periodic Review session of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.
Syllabus

Course size limited to 18