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Biography:

Liane Young is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Boston College, where she is the director of the Morality Lab. She received her post-doctoral training in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT, her Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Harvard University in 2008, and her B.A. in Philosophy (bioethics) from Harvard University in 2004. Her research focuses on the cognitive and neural basis of human moral judgment and behavior. Her current research focuses on the role of theory of mind and emotions in moral cognition. To explore these topics, she uses the methods of social psychology and cognitive neuroscience, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and examination of patient populations with specific cognitive deficits.


Appointments:

2011-now    Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Boston College

2008-2011  Post-doctoral Associate, Brain and Cognitive Sciences, MIT

2008-2011  Visiting Scholar, Department of Philosophy, MIT


Education:

2008           Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology, Harvard University

2004           B.A. in Philosophy (Magna Cum Laude), Harvard College


Research Support:

2012-2014  Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (Liane Young, Sloan Research Fellow)

                  

2011-2014  The Dana Foundation (Liane Young, P.I.)

                   The cognitive and neural basis of atypical social and moral cognition in high functioning   

                   autism.


2011-2014  The John Templeton Foundation (Liane Young, P.I.)

                   The psychology and neuroscience of when, why, and how people behave better.

Editorial Roles:

Psychological Science, Editorial Board, January 2012-present

PLoS ONE, Editorial Board, November 2011-present

Minds and Machines, Editorial Board, January 2011-present

Judgment and Decision Making (JDM), Consulting Editor, June 2013-present


Professional Memberships:

Society for Philosophy and Psychology, Executive Board Member, 2010-present

Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Member 

Society for Neuroscience, Member

American Psychological Association, Member


Honors:

2013             SPSP Theoretical Innovation Award (with Kurt Gray and Adam Waytz)            

2012             Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow

2011             Dana Neuroscience Scholar Award (in recognition of achievements to date and 

                     potential to advance the field of neuroscience)

2011             Early Career Award from Society for Social Neuroscience for Distinguished Scientific

                     Contributions to Social Neuroscience

2006-2008    National Science Foundation Graduate Student Fellowship

2006             William James Prize, awarded to the best paper submitted to the Society for

                     Philosophy and Psychology by a graduate student

2003, 2004   John Harvard Scholarship (for academic excellence at Harvard College)

2002             Detur Book Prize (for academic excellence at Harvard College)

2000             Intel Science Talent Search semifinalist

2000             National Merit Scholarship winner


*** To download PDFs of publications, please visit lab page ***


in press

Chakroff, A., Thomas, K., Haque, O. S., Young, L. (in press). An indecent proposal: The dual functions of indirect speech. Cognitive Science.

Rottman, J., Young, L. (in press). Comment: Scholarly Disgust and Related Mysteries. Emotion Review.

Chakroff, A., Young, L. (in press). The prosocial brain: perceiving others in need, and acting on it. In L. Padilla-Walker, G. Carlo (eds.), The Complexities of Raising Prosocial Children: An Examination of the Multidimensionality of Prosocial Behaviors. Oxford University Press.

Theriault, J., Young, L. (in press). Taking an “intentional stance” on moral psychology. In J. Sytsma (ed.), Advances in Experimental Philosophy of Mind. Continuum.


2014

Rottman, J., Kelemen, D., Young, L. (2014). Tainting the Soul: Purity Concerns Predict Moral Judgments of Suicide. Cognition, 130, 217-226.

Heiphetz, L., Young, L. (2014). A social cognitive developmental perspective on moral judgment. Behaviour, 151, 315-335.

Carmona-Perera, M., Clark, L., Young, L., Perez-Garcia, M., Verdejo-Garcia, A. (2014). Impaired decoding of far and disgust predicts utilitarian moral judgment in alcohol-dependent individuals. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 38, 179-185.


2013

Niemi, L., Young, L. (2013). Caring Across Boundaries Versus Keeping Boundaries Intact: Links between Moral Values and Interpersonal Orientations. PLOS ONE, 8(12): e81605.

Dufour, N., Redcay, E., Young, L., Mavros, P., Moran, J., Triantafyllou, C., Gabrieli, J., Saxe, R. (2013). Similar brain activation during false belief tasks in a large sample of adults with and without autism. PLOS ONE, 8(9): e75468.

Chakroff, A., Dungan, J., Young, L. (2013) Harming ourselves and defiling others: what determines a moral domain? PLOS ONE, 8(9): e74434.

Waytz, A., Dungan, J., Young, L. (2013). The Whistleblower’s Dilemma and the Fairness-Loyalty Tradeoff. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 1027-1033. [click here for NYT op-ed, 8/2/13]

Koster-Hale, J., Saxe, R., Dungan, J., Young, L. (2013). Decoding moral judgments from representations of intentions. PNAS, 110, 5648-5653.

Hawley-Dolan, A., Young, L. (2013). Whose Mind Matters More - The Agent of the Artist? An Investigation of Ethical and Aesthetic Evaluations. PLOS ONE, 8(9): e70759.

Gleichgerrcht, E., Young, L. (2013). Low Levels of Empathic Concern Predict Utilitarian Moral Judgment. PLOS ONE, 8(4), e60418.

Young, L., Durwin, A., (2013). Moral realism as moral motivation: The impact of meta-ethics on everyday decision-making. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 49, 302-206.

Young, L., Tsoi, L. (2013). When mental states matter, when they don’t, and what that means for morality. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 7(8), 585-604.

Young, L.*, Waytz, A.* (2013). Morality. In S. Baron-Cohen, H. Tager-Flusberg, M. Lombardo (eds.), Understanding Other Minds. Oxford University Press. *Equal contributors

Young, L. (2013). Moral thinking. In D. Reisberg (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Cognitive Psychology. Oxford University Press.

Saxe, R., Young, L. (2013). Theory of Mind: How brains think about thoughts. In K. Ochsner & S. Kosslyn (eds.) The Handbook of Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press.


2012

Young, L., Chakroff, A., Tom, J. (2012). Doing good leads to more good: The reinforcing power of a moral self-concept. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 3, 325-334.

Young, L.*, Koenigs, M.*, Kruepke, M., Newman, J. (2012). Psychopathy increases perceived moral permissibility of accidents. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 121, 659-667. *Equal contributors

Waytz, A., Young, L. (2012). The Group-Member Mind Tradeoff: Attributing Mind to Groups versus Group Members. Psychological Science, 23,77-85.

Carmona-Perera, M., Verdejo-Garcia, A., Young, L., Molina-Fernandez, A., Garcia-Perez, M. (2012). Moral decision-making in polysubstance dependent individuals. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 3, 389-392.

Young, L., Dungan, J. (2012). Where in the brain is morality? Everywhere and maybe nowhere. Social Neuroscience, 7, 1-10.

Gray, K., Young, L., Waytz, A. (2012). Mind Perception is the Essence of Morality. Psychological Inquiry, 23, 101-124. [target article] *** Winner of the SPSP Theoretical Innovation Award

Gray, K., Waytz, A., Young, L. (2012). The Moral Dyad: A Fundamental Template Unifying Moral Judgment. Psychological Inquiry, 23, 206-215. [response to commentaries -- please email for the commentaries]

Dungan, J., Young, L. (2012). The two-type model of morality. In D. Fassin (ed.) Companion to Moral Anthropology. Wiley-Blackwell, p. 578-594.


2011

Young, L., Saxe, R. (2011). When ignorance is no excuse: Different roles for intent across moral domains. Cognition, 120, 202-214.

Young, L.*, Phillips, J*. (2011). The Paradox of Moral Focus. Cognition, 119, 166-178. *Equal contributors

Moran, J.*, Young, L.*, Saxe, R., Lee, S., O’Young, D., Gabrieli, J. (2011). Impaired theory of mind for moral judgment in high-functioning autism. PNAS, 108, 2688-2692. * Equal contributors

Cushman, F., Young, L. (2011). Patterns of Moral Judgment Derive from Nonmoral Psychological Representations. Cognitive Science, 35, 1052-1075.

Young, L., Scholz, J., Saxe, R. (2011). Neural evidence for “intuitive prosecution”: The use of mental state information for negative moral verdicts. Social Neuroscience, 6, 302-315.

Young, L., Saxe, R. (2011). Moral universals and individual differences. Emotion Review, 3, 323-324.

Hawley-Dolan, A., Young, L. (2011). Whose Mind Matters More: The moral agent or the artist? The role of intent in ethics and aesthetics. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society.

Gweon, H., Young, L., & Saxe, R. (2011). Theory of Mind for you, and for me: behavioral and neural similarities and differences in thinking about beliefs of the self and other. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society.

Phillips, J., Young, L., (2011). Apparent Paradoxes in Moral Reasoning; Or how you forced him to do it, even though he wasn’t forced to do it. Proceedings of the 33rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society

Dungan, J., Young, L. (2011). Multiple Moralities: tensions and tradeoffs in moral psychology and the law. Thurgood Marshall Law Review, 36, 177-195.

Young, L. (2011). How we read people’s moral minds. In M. Brockman (ed.), Future Science: Essays from the Cutting Edge. Vintage.


2010

Young, L., Camprodon, J., Hauser, M., Pascual-Leone, A., Saxe, R. (2010). Disruption of the right temporo-parietal junction with TMS reduces the role of beliefs in moral judgments. PNAS, 107 6753-8.

Young, L., Bechara, A., Tranel, D., Damasio, H., Hauser, M., Damasio, A. (2010). Damage to prefrontal cortex impairs judgment of harmful intent. Neuron, 65, 845-851.

Young, L., Feder, D., Saxe, R. (2010). What gets the attention of the temporo-parietal junction? An fMRI investigation of attention and theory of mind. Neuropsychologia, 48, 2658-2664.

Young, L., Nichols, S., Saxe, R. (2010). Investigating the neural and cognitive basis of moral luck: It’s not what you do but what you know. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 1, 333-349.

Miller, M., Sinnott-Armstrong, W., Young, L., King, D., Paggi, A., Fabri, M., Polonara, G., Gazzaniga, M. (2010). Moral Reasoning in Split-Brain Patients. Neuropsychologia, 48, 2215-2220.

Young, L., Saxe, R., (2010). It’s not just what you do, but what’s on your mind: A review of Kwame Anthony Appiah’s “Experiments in Ethics”. Neuroethics, 3, 201-207.

Sinnott-Armstrong, W., Young, L., Cushman, F. (2010). Moral intuitions as heuristics. In J. Doris, G. Harman, S. Nichols, J. Prinz, W. Sinnott-Armstrong, S. Stich. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.

Cushman, F., Young, L., Greene, J. (2010). Me, myself, and I: Exploring our multi-system morality. In J. Doris, G. Harman, S. Nichols, J. Prinz, W. Sinnott-Armstrong, S. Stich. (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.

Young, L. (2010). How Easy Is It to Manipulate Someone’s Moral Reasoning? Science + Religion Today.

Young, L. (2010). Commentary on The New Science of Morality: On “A Statement of Consensus”. Edge.


2009

Young, L., Saxe, R. (2009). Innocent Intentions: A correlation between forgiveness of accidental harm and neural activity. Neuropsychologia, 47, 2065-2072.

Young, L., Saxe, R. (2009). An fMRI investigation of spontaneous mental state inference for moral judgment. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 21, 1396-1405.

Glenn, A., Raine, A., Schug, R., Young, L., Hauser, M. (2009). Increased DLPFC activity during moral decision-making in psychopathy. Molecular Psychiatry, 14, 908-911.

Cushman, F., Young, L. (2009). The psychology of dilemmas and the philosophy of morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, 12, 9-24.


2008

Young, L., Saxe, R. (2008). The neural basis of belief encoding and integration in moral judgment. NeuroImage, 40, 1912-1920.

Kliemann, D., Young, L., Scholz, J., Saxe, R. (2008). The influence of prior record on moral judgment. Neuropsychologia, 46, 2949-2957.

Hauser, M., Young, L., Cushman, F. (2008) "On Misreading the Linguistic Analogy: Response to Jesse Prinz and Ron Mallon." in Moral Psychology and Biology ed. W. Sinnott-Armstrong, New York: Oxford University Press.

Hauser, M., Young, L., Cushman, F. (2008). “Reviving Rawls' Linguistic Analogy” in Moral Psychology and Biology ed. W. Sinnott-Armstrong, New York: Oxford University Press.


2007

Young, L., Cushman, F., Hauser, M., Saxe, R. (2007). The neural basis of the interaction between theory of mind and moral judgment. PNAS, 104, 8235-8240.

Young, L., Koenigs, M. (2007). Investigating emotion in moral cognition: A review of evidence from functional neuroimaging and neuropsychology. British Medical Bulletin, 84, 69-79.

Koenigs, M.*, Young, L.*, Adolphs, R., Tranel, D., Cushman, F., Hauser, M., Damasio, A. (2007). Damage to prefrontal cortex increases utilitarian moral judgments. Nature, 446, 908-911. * Equal contributors

Hauser, M., Cushman, F., Young, L., Jin, R., Mikhail, J. (2007). A dissociation between moral judgment and justification. Mind and Language, 22, 1-21.


2006

Young, L., Cushman, F., Adolphs, R., Tranel, D., Hauser, M. (2006). Does emotion mediate the relationship between an action’s moral status and its intentional status? Neuropsychological Evidence. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 6, 265-278.

Cushman, F., Young, L., Hauser, M. (2006). The role of conscious reasoning and intuition in moral judgments: Testing three principles of harm. Psychological Science, 17, 1082-1089.

Cushman, F., Young, L., Hauser, M. (2006). The psychology of Justice: A commentary on Natural Justice by Ken Binmore. Analyse and Kritik, 28, 95-98.


Academic Talks (invited unless noted as submitted):

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Social Psychology Talk Series, Northeastern University, November 2013.

Moral cognition and environmental attitudes. Annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, November 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Harvard Society for Mind, Brain, and Behavior, Harvard University, November 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Princeton-Penn-Rutgers Seminar, October 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris, France, September 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Workshop on decision-making, Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, June 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Developmental Psychology Talk Series, Psychology Department, UMass Amherst, April 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Social Psychology Research Workshop, Harvard University, February 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Judgment and Decision-Making Pre-Conference, SPSP, New Orleans, January 2013.

Moral cognition: On high and on the ground. Morality and Justice Pre-Conference, SPSP, New Orleans, January 2013.

When the mind matters for morality. Harvard Social Brain Sciences Symposium, Cambridge, MA, December 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Austin, TX, October 2012

When the mind matters for morality. Conference on Normative Ethics, Oxford, England, July 2012.

The conflicted self does not cause its own actions. Society for Philosophy and Psychology, Boulder, CO, June 2012. (submitted talk)

When the mind matters for morality. International Workshop on “The Evolution of Morality: The Biology and Philosophy of Human Conscience”. International School of Ethology, at the “Ettore Majorana" Centre for Scientific Culture. Erice, Sicily, Italy, June, 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. Social and Affective Neuroscience Symposium at Human Brain Mapping, Beijing, China, June 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. Center for Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Research, McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School, May 2012.

How the Brain Makes Up the Moral Mind. Big Ideas for Busy People, Cambridge Science Festival, April 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. NYU Center for Bioethics, NYU, March 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. BC Law School Faculty Colloquium, January 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. Mind Perception Pre-Conference, SPSP, San Diego, January 2012.

Mental State Representations for Moral Judgment. The NeuroCog Collective, Nosara, Costa Rica, January 2012.

When the mind matters for morality. Metro Experimental Research Group, NYU, December 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Early Career Award Address at Society for Social Neuroscience, Washington, DC, November 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. TEDx, Utrecht, the Netherlands, November 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Washington University in St. Louis, October 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Brain & Cognition Talk Series, MGH Martinos Center, October 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Department of Psychology, Yale University, October 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Social Psychology Series, UMass Amherst, September 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Caltech & Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, CA, May 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Topics in Developmental Psychology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, May 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. NSF Workshop on the Future of Decision, Risk and Management Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, May 2011.

When the mind matters for morality. Eastern Psychological Association (EPA), Cambridge, MA, March 2011.

The brain behind the moral mind. Emerging Disciplines, Rice University, Houston, TX, February 2011.

Cognitive and neural signatures of motivated moral reasoning. Society of Experimental Social Psychology, Minneapolis, MN, October 2010.

When intent matters for morality. Culture and the Mind, Arts and Humanities Research Council, University of Sheffield, England, September 2010. 

Is there more to moral psychology than psychology. Society of Philosophy and Psychology, Portland, OR, June 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Society of Philosophy and Psychology, Portland, OR, June 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. International Cognitive Neuroscience Meeting, Istanbul, Turkey, May 2010

The role of intent across distinct moral domains. NSF Symposium on Neuroethics, UNC, Charlotte, NC, April 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Brain, Mind, & Society Seminar, Caltech, Pasadena, CA, April 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Berkman Center at Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA, March 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Center for Behavioral Decision Research, Carnegie Mellon University, January 2010

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Social-Personality Brown Bag series, Brown University, Providence, RI, December 2009

Mental state reasoning for establishing innocence and guilt. Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences. Dartmouth College, December 2009

How the brain makes up the moral mind. 10th Annual Scholarship Conference of the Society for Evolutionary Analysis in Law, sponsored by Law and Human Behavior Program at Vanderbilt, the Law and Behavioral Biology Speaker Series at Vanderbilt, and the Gruter Institute for Law and Behavioral Research, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, April 2009

Benign beliefs & destructive desires: A mental state model of forgiveness and blame. Moral Psychology Research Group at University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2009

Panel at National Undergraduate Bioethics Conference, sponsored by Harvard Undergraduate

Bioethics Conference. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA March 2009

How the brain makes up the moral mind. Cognitive Brown Bag Series, Psychological & Brain

Sciences Department, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, February 2009

How the brain makes up the moral mind: The neuroscience of mental state reasoning in moral judgment. Cognition, Brain, and Behavior Research Seminar, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, December 2008

How the brain makes up the moral mind: The neuroscience of mental state reasoning in moral judgment. Neuro-philosophy Series, Georgia State, Atlanta, GA, November 2008

Reading minds for moral judgment: A cognitive neuroscience approach. Lecture at Cold Spring Harbor Summer Course, The Biology of Social Cognition, New York, NY, July 2008

Reading minds for moral judgment: A cognitive neuroscience approach. Experimental Philosophy Workshop at Society for Philosophy and Psychology, Philadelphia, PA, June 2008

Reading minds for moral judgment: A cognitive neuroscience approach. Workshop on Moral Psychology, Institut Jean Nicod-CNRS, Paris, France, June 2008

Reading minds for moral judgment: A cognitive neuroscience approach. Cog Lunch, MIT, Cambridge, MA, March 2008

Reading minds for moral judgment: A cognitive neuroscience approach. Bates College, ME, February 2008 (as a Mellon Associate in Humanities and Social Science)

The guilty mind: A cognitive neuroscience approach to theory of mind in moral judgment. Society for Philosophy and Psychology Conference, York University, Toronto, June 2007

Emotion and moral judgment. Guest lecture for Moral Psychology graduate-level course by Jesse Prinz and Joshua Knobe, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC, April 2007

Two-process model of moral judgment. With Fiery Cushman. Moral Psychology Research Group at Rutgers, NJ, December 2006

Moral sense test. With Fiery Cushman. Guest lecture for Moral Psychology undergraduate-level course by Richard Holton, MIT, Cambridge, MA, November 2007.

The role of emotion in moral cognition. International Society for Research on Emotions, Atlanta, GA, August 2006

The role of emotion in moral cognition. Society for Philosophy and Psychology Conference, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, June 2006

Emotion and moral judgment: Neuropsychological evidence. Moral Psychology Workshop at MIT, Cambridge, MA, November 2006 

The role of emotion in moral cognition. Neuroscience and Moral Psychology Conference, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, March 2006

Intuition and moral judgment. With Fiery Cushman. Cognition, Brain, and Behavior Research Seminar, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, September 2004


Interdisciplinary Presentations:

The guilty mind: A cognitive neuroscience approach to theory of mind in moral judgment. Neurobiology Department, Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, December 2007

Comments on Wright & Bengson: Asymmetries in folk judgments of responsibility and intentional action. American Philosophical Association, Central Division, Chicago, IL, April 2007

Integrating theory of mind and moral judgment. Neuroethics and Empirical Moral Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway, March 2007

Moral judgment: Empirical studies and philosophical implications. American Philosophical Association, Eastern Division, Washington, DC, December 2006


Chaired Symposia:

Moral Psychology. Society for Philosophy and Psychology Conference, York University, Toronto, June 2007


Poster Presentations:

Damage to prefrontal cortex impairs judgment of harmful intent. Society for Neuroscience, Chicago, IL, October 2009

A role for theory of mind in judging helpful versus harmful actions: An fMRI investigation. Social Affective Neuroscience Meeting, Boston, MA, June 2008

Disrupting neural mechanisms involved in belief attribution impairs moral judgment. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, San Francisco, CA, April 2008


Interdisciplinary Activities:

Biannual workshops of the Moral Psychology Research Group (MPRG) for production of The Oxford Handbook of Moral Psychology (2004-present)

Founder/president of Harvard Society for Mind, Brain and Behavior


Public Media Coverage:

Morality in making decisions, The Boston Globe, 3/2/2012

The hive mind made me do it, The Boston Globe, 12/18/2011

Morality is other people, The Daily Beast, 12/18/2011

How we assign blame for corporate crimes, MSNBC / Business News Daily, 12/11/2011

Individuals Are Removed from Blame When in Groups, Scientific American, 12/11/2011

How People Assign Blame: Cohesive Groups Hold Members Less Responsible for Individual Actions, Science Daily, 12/8/2011

Can Companies, Political Groups or Organizations Have a Single Mind?, Association for Psychological Science, 12/5/2011

The Vexing Mental Tug-of-War Called Morality, Discover, 9/16/2011

How Does the Brain Work? Nova ScienceNOW, 2/2/2011

Adults with Autism May Not Understand Others’ Intentions, U.S. News & World Report, 2/2/2011

Understanding the Autistic Mind, Science Daily, 2/1/2011

Perception of morality different when you have autism, MSNBC, 1/31/2011

Top 100 Science Stories of 2010. Discover, 12/16/2010

Judging other people’s intentions. Simply Science, Nature, 7/12/2010

Altering conscience? The Dana Foundation, 6/18/2010

Magnets, morality, and reasoning. Psychology Today, 6/11/2010

No harm, no foul. Psychology Today, 4/13/2010

Morality of murder. Research Highlights, Nature, 4/1/2010

Magnets can alter judgment. CNN Newsroom, 4/1/2010

Magnet mayhem: Modifying morality with magnets. ABC News, 3/31/2010

The amazing brain. Telegraph (UK), 3/31/2010

[radio interview] Canadian Broadcasting Company, 3/31/2010

Morality is modified in the lab. BBC News, 3/30/2010

Can morality be changed magnetically? CNN, 3/30/2010

Magnetic waves alter moral compass. CBS News, 3/30/2010

Magnets can sway ‘Moral Compass’. FOX News, 3/30/2010

Scientists discover moral compass in the brain which can be controlled by magnets. Daily Mail, 3/30/2010

Magnets placed near brain can disrupt person’s moral compass. NY Daily News, 3/30/2010

A magnetic field applied to the brain can alter people’s sense of morality. Popular Science, 3/30/2010

Moral compass influenced by magnets. Times Online (UK), 3/30/2010

Magnets can turn off a person’s moral compass. Toronto Sun, 3/30/2010

Magnetism can sway man’s moral compass. Slashdot, 3/30/2010

Brain scientists say root of morality. Mirror (UK) 3/30/2010

How does the brain make moral judgments. Science + Religion Today, 3/30/2010

Brain damage skews our moral compass. New Scientist, 3/30/2010

Study narrows gap between mind and brain. NPR, All Things Considered, 3/29/2010

Magnets mess minds, morality. Nature, 3/29/2010

Murder or an accident? The brain knows. Science, 3/29/2010

Magnets can alter morality. MSNBC, 3/29/2010

Morality altered by brain stimulation. LiveScience, 3/29/2010

Scientists tweak subjects’ brains to alter their moral choices. MSN, 3/29/2010

When is attempted murder more acceptable than harming someone by accident? Discover, 3/26/2010

Emotions key to judging others. Science Daily, 3/25/2010

Morality - it’s in your mind, next to emotions. The Independent (UK), 3/25/2010

Brain’s ‘moral outrage’ center pinpointed. Businessweek, 3/24/2010

The roots of morality. Science, 5/18/2009

The moral instinct. NY Times, 1/13/2008

Scientists draw link between morality and brain’s wiring. Wall Street Journal, 5/11/2007

Scanning the brain for its moral center. ABC News / Nightline, 5/2/2007

Making the paper: Brain damage offers clues to the role of emotions in moral decisions. Nature, 4/19/2007

Mind makes right: Brain damage, evolution, and the future of morality. Slate, 3/31/2007

Posing the right question. The Economist, 3/2/2007