CURRICULUM VITAE

Boston College English Department Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3806
frederir@bc.edu; (617) 552-3717; FAX (617) 552-4220

TEACHING POSITIONS
Boston College
, English Department
      Assistant Professor, Fall 1998 to Present

The University of Pittsburgh, Department of English
      Post-doctoral Fellow/Instructor, Fall 1997 to Spring 1998

The University of Pennsylvania, Department of English
      Instructor, Fall 1992 and 1993, Spring 1993
      Teaching Assistant, Fall 1994, Spring 1995
      Grader, Fall 1995

PUBLICATIONS
Manuscript
“Colón Man a Come”: Mythographies of Panamá Canal Migration
(Lexington Books-Rowman & Littlefield, January 2005)

Articles
Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History: The Black Experience in the Americas, entries on “The Colón Man” and “Jan Carew,” forthcoming.

“Creole Performance in Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands.Gender and History 15.3 (November 2003): 487-506.  Reissued as “Creole Performance in Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands,Dialogues of Dispersal: Gender, Sexuality and African Diasporas.  Edited by Sandra Gunning, Tera W. Hunter, and Michele Mitchell (Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004): 91-110.

“Mythographies of Panamá Canal Migrations: Eric Walrond’s ‘Panama Gold’.”  Marginal Migrations: The Circulation of Cultures within the Caribbean. Oxford: Macmillan Press—Warwick University Caribbean Studies, 2003.  Pp. 43-76.

“What If You’re an ‘Incredibly Unattractive, Fat, Pastrylike-fleshed Man’?: Teaching Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place.” College Literature30.3 Summer 03, 1-18.

“Colón Man Version: Oppositional Narratives and Jamaican Identity in Michael Thelwell’s The Harder They Come.”  Identity: An International Journal of Theory and Research 2.2 (2002), 157-176.

“Jamaica Kincaid,” The Columbia Companion to the 20th Century American Short Story, 2001.

“The Ethnic Consciousness Movement.”  The Oxford Companion to Women's Writing in the United States.  New York:  Oxford University Press, 1994.

“‘She ain’t got no more idea what’s going on in her house than a jackrabbit’:  Detection and Critique in BarbaraNeely’s Blanche on the Lam,” in progress.“Back to the Future: Genre and Culture in Nalo Hopkinson’s Midnight Robber,” in progress.

Reviews
Review of Hitting a Straight Lick with a Crooked Stick:  Race and Gender in the Work of Zora Neale Hurston by Susan Edwards Meisenhelder (Tuscaloosa:  University of Alabama Press, 1999) for American Literature 73.1 (March 2001): 209-210.

Interviews
Diana Wright, Mystik 1580 AM, “South Florida Speaks Out (Talk)” 12 pm - 1 pm, 29 September 2003, http://www.wsrf.com, TOPIC: Graduate course, “Jamaican Culture and Globalization”

INVITED TALKS
“Pedagogy and Practice: Contemporary Haitian Cultures and ‘Globalization’”
“Swimming Against the Tides: Caribbean Culture in the Age of Globalization” Symposium
    University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, April 22, 2004

“(Un)Quiet Migrations: Intra-Regional Movements in Maryse Condé’s Tree of Life”Black Atlantic / African Diaspora, 2003-2004 seminar series
    The Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis
    Rutgers University, 20 October 2003

“The Money Was Paid Small, but We Live Big”: Epistolary Narratives of the Panamá Canal
    Faculty Research Symposium
    Boston College, 6 December 2002

Mainstream and Memoir: Competing Narratives of the Panamá Canal
    Program in the History of the African Diaspora
    New York University, 16 October 2001

“The Money Was Paid Small, but We Live Big”:  Epistolary Narratives of the Panamá Canal
    The Mary Lou William Center for Black Culture
    Duke University, 25 October 2001

“An Aesthetics of Complication: Caribbeanness and the Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands
    American Studies Brown Bag Series
    Boston College, 19 March 2001

PRESENTATIONS
“An Imaginative Response to Globalization: Margaret Cezair-Thompson’s The True History of Paradise
Caribbean Studies Association, 29th Annual Conference
St. Kitts/Nevis, 31 May – 5 June 2004

“Genre and Culture in Nalo Hopkinson’s Midnight Robber
9th International Conference of the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, April 26 to 30, 2004

“Back to the Future: Genre and Culture in Nalo Hopkinson’s Oeuvre,” Panel Chair
Caribbean Studies Association, 28th Annual Conference
Belize City, Belize, 26-31 2003

“History/Histories/Stories: Situating the Panamá Canal and Colón Men”
“Borders, Boundaries, and the Global in Caribbean Studies”
Bowdoin College, 11-13 April 2003

Queer as Folk: Interpreting Ella Heath in “Panama Gold”
8th International Conference of the Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars
Trois Ilets, Martinique, 2-6 April 2002 

“‘Gone a Colón’: Lyrical Narratives of Panamá Migration”
Caribbean Studies Association, 26th Annual Conference
Maho Beach Hotel, St. Maarten, 27 May-2 June 2001 

“Literary Representations of the Panamá Canal Migration Worker”
Caribbean Literary Studies, University of Miami, 28 September – 1 October 2000

“A Glimpse of the Archipelago: Eric Walrond’s ‘The Wharf Rats’”
Caribbean Studies Association, 25th Annual Conference
Castries, St. Lucia, 29 May – 3 June 2000

“What If You’re an ‘Incredibly Unattractive, Fat, Pastrylike-fleshed [Wo]Man’?: Teaching Jamaica Kincaid’s A Small Place
7th International Conference of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars
Mayagüez, Puerto Rico, 3-7 April 2000

“Mythographies of Panamá Canal Migrations”
Caribbean Studies Association, 24th Annual Conference
Panamá City, Panamá, 24-29 May 1999

“An Aesthetics of Complication:  Reading Post-Colonial Subjectivity in the Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands
6th International Conference of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars
Grand Anse, Grenada, 18-22 May 1998

“History/Histories/Stories:  Panamá Migration and Post-colonial Subjectivity”
Caribbean Studies Association, 23rd Annual Conference
St. George, Antigua 26-30 May 1998

“The ‘Disorderly’ Panamá Woman:  The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands
Race and Ethnicity Study Group
University of Pittsburgh, 13 November 1997

“Colón Man Version:  Reading Caribbeanness in Michael Thelwell’s The Harder They Come
“Is the Post-Colonial Caribbean? Is the Caribbean Post-Colonial?”
Duke University, Durham, NC,  February 28-March 2, 1997

AWARDS AND HONORS
     Research Expense Grant, Boston College, Winter/Spring 2003-2004
     Emerging Voices, New Directions/Ford Foundation Summer Grant, 2003.
     Scholars-in-Residence Fellowship, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, 2001-2002
     DuBois-Mandela-Rodney Fellowship, University of Michigan, 2001-2002 (declined)
     Faculty Fellowship, Boston College, Fall 2001 (declined)
     Research Incentive Grant, Boston College, Spring 2000
     NEH Summer Stipend, Boston College Junior Faculty Nominee, Fall 1999
     Cornell School of Criticism and Theory, July/August 1999
     Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Pittsburgh, September 1997
     Mellon Bank Minority Dissertation Fellowship, University of Pennsylvania, September 1996
     Graduate/Professional Student Outstanding Achievement Award, Univ. of Pennsylvania, March 1996
     Andrew W. Mellon Final-Year Dissertation Fellowship, University of Pennsylvania, 1995
     Caribbean Writers Summer Institute, University of Miami, July 1994 and 1996
     Fontaine Fellow, University of Pennsylvania, 1991 and 1994

EDUCATION
The University of Pennsylvania, School of Arts and Sciences
      Ph.D., English, December 1997
      M. A., English, August 1994
      B. A., English, May 1987

COURSES TAUGHT
Boston College

      Jamaican Culture and Globalization (graduate)
      Seminar: Toni Morrison (senior seminar)
      Caribbean Intellectual History (graduate)
      Readings and Research – Realism and Modernism in American Literature
      Readings and Research – African American Women’s Popular Fiction
      Writing America(s) – Realism and Modernism in American Literature
      Narrative and Interpretation – Women Writers of the African Diaspora
      Traditions/Counter-traditions – “Topics in ‘Black’ Writing”
      Introduction to Caribbean Writers – “Against the Tourist Grain”
      Black Women’s Writing – “Versions in Black”

University of Pittsburgh
      Literature, Tradition, and the New – “Gender and Sexuality in the Americas”

University of Pennsylvania
      “Encountering the City”
      Writing About Literature – “Forms of Perfect Union,” “‘People of Color’ in the White Imagination”
      Writing About the Narrative – “20th Century Caribbean Literature”

ACADEMIC AND COMMUNITY SERVICE
Boston College
, Chestnut Hill, MA
      Awards and Prizes Committee, September 2003 – May 2004
      Referee, Callaloo, August 2000 – Present
      Assistant to Director of Masters Program, September 2002 – Present
      Faculty Advisor, AHANA Graduate Student Association, September 2000 – Present
      Thomas Rattigan Chair Search Committee, September 2002 – May 2003
      Awards and Prizes Committee, September 2000 – May 2001
      Masters Admissions Committee, Spring 1999, 2000, 2003
      Post-1945 American Literature and Culture Search Committee, September 1998 – May 2000
      Awards and Prizes Committee, September 1998 - May 1999
      Co-Sponsor: “Race and Gender Perspectives in Caribbean Studies,” October 2002
     Panel Organizer:  “Who’s (un)Welcome in the 1990s?:  U.S. Immigration, Policy, and the Law”
     Lecture Organizer:  Tera W. Hunter (Carnegie Mellon University), “‘Work that Body”:
         Black Women, Work, and Leisure in Atlanta and the New South”, 12 March 1999

Germantown Women's Educational Project, Philadelphia, PA
      GED Teaching Assistant, August 1996 - August 1997

PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
     American Studies Association (ASA)Association of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars (ACWWS), Secretary (2004)
     Caribbean Studies Association (CSA)Modern Languages Association (MLA)