Weekly Discussion and Review Questions

 Chapter 9 Economic Dislocations and Democracy

Questions of the Documents: :

What were the most important effects of the post-war hyper-inflation on the people of the new German republic? Why? Who mainly suffered from the inflation? Why?

What is a "depression?" What factors have to be included in this definition?

Were the farmers in a depression prior to 1929? What were the symptoms of their economic woes? Why did the price of such commodities like corn create these hardships? How did the farmers react politically?

Why do most people date the "Great Depression" from 1929? When did massive unemployment start? Who were most affected by unemployment? Why?

How did people respond to unemployment? What techniques did they evolve to survive?

Was the impact of unemployment any different in Europe than in America? Did Europeans respond differently? Why? What differences existed in organized relief?

How did people respond to going on relief? Cite specific examples to support your answer.

What individuals or groups do a number of documents show Europeans (especially Germans) blaming for the depression? In contrast, whom or what do Americans and Canadians fault?

What was the main impact of the depression on middle-class people like Frau Schmidt and Ward James? On laborers and lower-middle class people, such Heinz Hackendahl (and Max's family in Knickerbocker's account)?

How did long-term unemployment affect the outlook of individual? What kinds of emotions are evident? Do you see changes in philosophy, view of the past or attitude toward the future?

What radicalization processes are apparent in these documents? What protests could workers offer? Why were these so ineffective?

What economic problems did the USSR face after 1928? What was Stalin's solution? Why did Stalin insist on forced collectivization and elimination of the kulaks?

Why would Stalin's Five-Year Plans appeal to some in the West? What in these plans would have antagonized many in the West? How would the Soviet people have responded to such charges?

Using Christopher Lasch's account, why was there no revolution in the United States (or Great Britain and Canada)? Was it because of trust in capitalism?

What documentary evidence does this chapter contain which would suggest that Germany would experience a revolution?

 

Chapter Summary Questions:

Terms to Know

Inflation
Depression
recession
mortgage
foreclosure
case worker
relief
WPA
stamping
the jungle
bumming
bread line

 

National Unemployment Statistics

What does this chart reveal about the impact, start and extent of the depression?

Country

March 1929

March 1930

March 1931

March 1932

March 1933

Total Population 1930

Austria

225,000

239.000

304,000

417,000

456,000

6.760,000

Belgium

28,000

42,000

207,000

350,000

383,000

8,092,000

Canada

50,000

88,000

340,000

634,000

878,000

10,377,000

Czechoslovakia

12,000

29.000

32,000

77,000

80,000

14,730,000

Denmark

66,000

49,000

70,000

145,000

166.00

3,551,000

Estonia

4,000

4,000

3,000

8,000

15,000

1,126,000

Finland

3,000

10.000

11,000

18,000

19.000

3,463,000

France

9,000

14,000

72,000

347,000

356,000

41,228,000

Germany

2,484,000

3,041,000

4,744,000

6,034,000

5,599,,000

66,030,000

Hungary

14,000

43.000

55,000

71,000

69,000

8,688,000

Irish Free State

19,000

23,000

25,000

31,000

83,800

2.942,000

Italy

309,000

413,000

735,000

1,085,000

1,111,000

41,177,000

Latvia

9,000

6.000

9,000

23,000

31,000

1,900,000

Netherlands

-

-

-

253,000

342,800

7,936,000

Norway

24,000

23,000

29.000

38,000

42,000

2,814,000

Poland

177,000

289,000

373,000

360,000

280,000

32,107,000

Romania

10,000

13,000

48,000

55,000

na

18,057000

Saarland

9,000

9,000

18,000

45,000

42,000

812,000

Sweden

44,000

42.000

73,000

99,000

121,000

6,142,000

Switzerland

9,000

21,000

61,000

103,000

113,800

4,006,000

United Kingdom

1,204,000

1,694,000

2,666,000

2,660,000

2,821,000

44,795,000

United States

na

2,964.000

6,403,000

10,477,000

13,359,000

122,775,000

Yugoslavia

12,000

10,000

12,000

23,000

23,800

13,934,000

Return to Hs 002.01, the Core History Course Page
Return to Professor Heineman's Homepage Index