< Dissertations

Courses Taught

HS565: American Immigration I
Undergraduate lecture
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
This is the first half of a two-semester lecture course on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1865 and the second from 1865 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. In the first semester we examine the history of immigration in the colonial and antebellum eras, with a focus on the encounter of Native Americans, Europeans, and Africans; the overseas origins of migration, both voluntary and involuntary; the parallel development of slavery and freedom in early America; the impact of the American Revolution on definitions of citizenship, ethnicity, assimilation, and nationality; and the onset of mass immigration from Germany and Ireland in the antebellum era.

HS566: American Immigration II
Undergraduate lecture
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
This is the second half of a two-semester lecture course on American immigration. The first half covers the period up to 1865 and the second from 1865 to the present. Each half can be taken independently of the other. In the second semester we examine the history of Irish, Italian, Jewish, Latino, and Asian Americans since the Civil War, with particular attention to the overseas origins of migration; patterns of settlement and mobility; questions of ethnicity, race, labor, and class; anti-immigrant sentiment; and the evolution of government policy.

HS600: The French and Indian War (1754-63)
Undergraduate seminar
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
The great imperial struggle between Britain and France for mastery over North America has been described as the first world war and as America's forgotten war. Part of a global conflict known as the Seven Years' War, which engulfed Europe and parts of Asia and Africa as well as North America, the French and Indian War transformed the relationship between the American colonies and Britain and determined the place of Indians in American history. This intensive readings class examines the origins, course, and consequences of the war from the early eighteenth century through the American Revolution.

HS182: American Civilization II
Undergraduate lecture
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
This course examines the principal themes in American history since the Civil War, especially race, immigration, labor, wars and foreign policy, and the balance between civil liberties and national security.

HS558: The American Irish
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
Upper-division undergraduate lecture
An exercise in transatlantic history, this course examines the origins of Irish migration, the history of Irish people and their descendants in America, and the connections and interactions between the Irish at home and abroad. The principal themes are the process of migration and settlement, labor and class, race and gender, religion, politics, nationalism and, encompassing all of these, the evolution of ethnic identity.

HS668: American Immigration and Ethnicity
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
Upper-division undergraduate seminar
This course examines the history of American immigration and ethnicity from the colonial era to the present  with particular attention to the causes of migration; patterns of settlement; ethnicity, race, labor, and class; anti-immigrant sentiment (nativism); government policy; and ethnic mobilization. The course takes the form of intensive reading and discussion of historiography.

HS885: Irish Migration to North America
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
Graduate colloquium (advanced readings)
In the three centuries since 1700 as many as ten million men, women, and children have migrated from Ireland, the great majority of them to North America. This course begins by considering different conceptions of migration: as voluntary movement, as exile or banishment, as diaspora. Taking a transatlantic perspective, we proceed to examine the conditions in Ireland that led to mass migration in four main periods (colonial, pre-famine, famine, and post-famine), along with the principal themes in the history of the American Irish, including labor, race, gender, religion, politics, and nationalism.

HS971: Research Seminar on Nineteenth-Century American History
Advanced graduate seminar
Syllabus webpage [PDF]
This seminar explores selected topics in nineteenth-century American history. We examine issues surrounding the identification, criticism, and use of primary sources, conventions of scholarly usage, and forms of historical argumentation. Each member of the seminar identifies a research topic, develops a proposal, conducts research in local archives, and presents a substantial research paper for critique and revision. The goal is to produce a final paper of publishable quality.